Sunday, May 21, 2017

Intel Euclid Vision Computer

Intel keeps investing in its vision-based solution and capabilities. The recently announced Euclid Development Kit is a fully stand-alone computer integrating RealSense IR stereo depth camera, a fish eye camera, an RGB camera, an Atom x7-Z8700 Quad core CPU, microphone, GPS, WiFi, and Bluetooth to produce a compact all-in-one computer and depth camera in the size of a candy bar. It comes with a 2000mAh battery so it is completely stand alone.


Thanks to AM for the link!

10 comments:

  1. WOW!!! how and when can I buy one???

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  2. you can order one via: https://click.intel.com/intelr-euclidtm-development-kit.html

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  3. price? availability?

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  4. Expected Availability - May 31, 2017
    $399.00

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  5. Is Intel switching from structured light depth sensing to stereo vision based depth sensing?

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    1. They have both, for a long time. The stereo technology came from TZYX acquizition.

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  6. Of the two, Intel's structured light depth quality is better than their stereo depth quality.
    The former at much closer range, and the latter is just not very good at any range.

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    1. Independent, peer-reviewed research suggests that the R200 (stereo) is much more accurate than their F200 (structured light) system when compared under identical conditions: http://www.cv-foundation.org/openaccess/content_cvpr_2016/papers/Fanello_HyperDepth_Learning_Depth_CVPR_2016_paper.pdf

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    2. Nice paper, thank you for the mention. Looking into it briefly I see my comment is consistent. At much closer up ranges, they don't even provide data for R200 (due to it's larger stereo baseline) , and at farther ranges, they don't provide data for F200, the two range regions not overlapping much, it at all. So I would say, The F and R were not being compared under identical conditions, unless I missed something.

      My experience is anecdotal, in doing some scan work with both devices and finding out quite quickly they are for two totally different range regions.

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  7. Whose pattern patent is Intel using for their structured light?

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